2011 Prize Winners


Dr. Camille KandikoDr. Camille Kandiko from King's College London was awarded the 2011 Prize for her proposal entitled:

"Why work in academia? A comparative analysis of motivation and prestige factors of academics in different national contexts'"

Camille joined King's Learning Institute at King's College London as a Research Associate in 2008. She is working on KCL curriculum initiatives through The King's Experience, including developing College-wide interdisciplinary modules. Her research focuses on international and comparative higher education, with areas of interest in curriculum and the student experience, academic motivation, PhD supervision, and developing the use of concept mapping in higher education.

Camille holds a first degree in English and Classics from Cornell University (USA) and a Masters degree in Higher Education Administration from The University of Pennsylvania (USA). She was awarded her PhD by Indiana University (USA) in 2007; her thesis title was Student Engagement in Canada and the U.S. in an Era of Globalization. Before taking up her post at the Institute, she was project associate at IU working on the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE).

Camille's report is now available from the following link Why work in academia? A comparative analysis of motivation and prestige factors of academics in different national contexts.


Dr. Harriet DismoreDr. Harriet Dismore from Brunel University was awarded the 2011 Prize for her proposal entitled:

"Attitudes towards learning among former apprentices who progress to higher education"

Harriet is a Lecturer in Education at Brunel University. She began her career as a Research Fellow in Educational Research at Canterbury Christ Church University, where she completed her doctoral study investigating children's attitudes towards physical education during transition. She then moved to the University of Plymouth to work with a large higher education in further education partnership and develop her research into transitions.

At Brunel, Harriet teaches on the BA in Contemporary Education programme and leads modules dedicated to enhancing study skills and research methods. She also supervises Master's and Doctoral level students. She is keen to explore curriculum design for transition into higher education and lifelong learning, especially in relation to students who take alternative routes.

Harriet has worked on a range of projects investigating the transitions of people in education, including from primary to secondary school, accreditation of prior learning, apprenticeships, progression from further to higher education and transitions into higher education and employment. This project, focusing upon the attitudes towards learning of former apprentices who progress to higher education, will build on her earlier work and provide new insights into learning among students who progress between vocational and academic programmes.

Harriet's report is now available from the following link Attitudes towards learning among former apprentices who progress to higher education.

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