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CHEER, Being a Migrant Academic in Japan

5 March 2019

Date: Tuesday 5 March 2019
Time: 12-1.30pm
Venue: Venue: Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER), University of Sussex, Room 106, Ashdown House
Speaker: Professor Robert W. Aspinall, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan

Being a Migrant Academic in Japan

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In the Japanese University system, the strong impression remains that Japanese employees are permanent and foreign employees are temporary. This was traditionally justified by the view that foreign academic staff have two functions: to be involved in specific research projects that are time limited; and to act as ‘native speakers’, ie. living, breathing embodiments of their own culture and language (something which, by definition, cannot be done by a Japanese national). However, many foreign nationals, especially those who specialise in Japanese Studies, the teaching of English as a foreign language, or related fields, have been able to build long-lasting careers there. This presentation will introduce some of the strategies adopted by those academics who have a long experience in Japan. It will also introduce some ethnographic studies of non-Japanese staff who work in the higher education system in Japan.

 

 
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