Past Event details

Exploring Doctoral Pedagogy on the Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD)

Thursday, 25 October 2018

Seminar overview

This postgraduate seminar arises from sharing practice at the EdD national network and seeks to provide further insights into doctoral education, specifically focusing on doctoral pedagogy on EdD programmes. The range of contributions seek to challenge some of the embedded assumptions relating to student learning and reveal some complex elements in navigating the doctoral journey.

Dr Julie Shaughnessy, Roehampton University, London.

 

Seminar Timetable

12.00-1.00                           Lunch and Welcome

Dr Richard Race, University of Roehampton

1.00-1.45                              Lessons Learnt from the Professional Doctorate in Education Pedagogy: Practice to Share with Degree Apprenticeship and Other Workplace Learning Programmes

Professor Denise Hawkes, University of Greenwich

1.45-2.30                              Supervision of professional doctoral students: investigating pedagogy for supporting critical voice and theorisation.

Julie Shaughnessy, University of Roehampton and Nick Pratt, University of Plymouth

2.30-3.00                              Break and opportunity for peer discussion

3.00-3.45                              Which shoes are mine? Re-imaging the journey towards Level 8.

Alasdair Richardson & Rhiannon Love, University of Winchester

3.45-4.15                              Group Discussion

 

 

Paper 1: Lessons Learnt from the Professional Doctorate in Education Pedagogy: Practice to Share with Degree Apprenticeship and Other Workplace Learning Programmes

Professor Denise Hawkes, Department of International Business and Economics, University of Greenwich and Centre for Doctoral Education, UCL Institute of Education

Abstract

In March 2018, a special issue of the London Review of Education attempted to take stock of the state of play of the academic literature on professional doctorates. It highlighted the amazing development of professional doctorates over the past 20 years in terms of professional doctorates in education pedagogy and their student experience. It is also clear from the collection that the practice developed in this literature has much to be able to add to the growing developments in degree apprenticeships and other workplace learning programme. The insights that could be shared are many but include: the effective balance between workplace and study, effect management of the cohort to ensure significant value of the cohort experience for workplace learners and the role of developing true reflective practice. In this presentation, key aspects of professional doctoral practice will be identified and assessed in terms of their value to the development of degree apprenticeships, especially those in economics and business. The results highlight the need for education researchers to be bolder in their sharing of good practice beyond those in education faculties in order for education research to have a true impact on higher education practice.

Presenter Biography 

Denise Hawkes was the EdD programme leader at UCL Institute of Education before her appointment as the Head of Department of International Business and Economics at the University of Greenwich. As a Professor in Education Economics, she has spent her early academic career working in economics, business and education departments. Her research is informed by both economics and education, taking issues of interest in higher education and using econometric techniques to address these. She has recently co-edited a special issue of the London Review of Education on Professional Doctorates and has a particular interest in the impact of doctoral education.

 

Paper 2: Title: Supervision of professional doctoral students: investigating pedagogy for supporting critical voice and theorisation.

Julie Shaughnessy, University of Roehampton and Nick Pratt, University of Plymouth

Abstract

This presentation reflects on research undertaken to understand more fully doctoral supervisory processes; specifically, how supervisors can support the development of critical voice and theorisation with Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) students. It reports on a research project undertaken in 2017-2018 based on interviews with supervisors, a documentary analysis of programmes and Skype interviews with students from five EdD programmes around the UK.

We will consider the complexity of supervisors’ pedagogical approaches and doctoral practices. In particular we consider the complexity and tensions within supervision and consider how these are surfaced in supporting EdD students to develop critical voice, theory and theorisation. Using Bernstein’s notion of ‘pedagogic relations’ (Bernstein and Solomon, 1999), we consider the influence of competing discourses, places and space, relationships and physical/conceptual resources all of which operate to shape practice. This sheds light on the tensions and embedded assumptions that are largely taken for granted in the literature and in institutional practices.  Through the paper invite reflection on the nature and practice of doctoral education within, and beyond, institutional settings.

Presenter biographies

Julie Shaughnessy is a Principal Lecturer and Programme Director of the Professional Doctorate in Education. She contributes to a range of professional development programmes in the School of Education. Her research interests focus on pedagogy, teacher development, teaching and learning, violence and bullying in schools and exclusion.

Nick Pratt is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Director of the EdD in the Plymouth Institute of Education. His EdD teaching is focused particularly on different ways to understand learning and his research interests focus on the social and cultural relationships which connect policy and teachers’ practices in the workplace.

 

Paper 3: Which shoes are mine? Re-imaging the journey towards Level 8.

Alasdair Richardson & Rhiannon Love, University of Winchester

Abstract

This presentation considers the process of revalidating our Professional Doctorate programme recently, from the points of view of Programme Leader and student. We will reflect on the decisions we made and the rationale involved. Particularly, we will focus on our first Level 8 module, in which students make the transition from masters level study to exploring the ‘doctoral voice’. The module has three parts: positionality, a limited literature review, and the preparation of a research proposal. Alasdair will explain how the module evolved from what it was (with an emphasis on ‘autobiography’ and ‘policy’) to what it has become. Rhiannon will offer the student perspective as someone who has recently completed the module. We will consider to what extend doctoral study is a study of the self, or whether it is more simply a case of finding the right ‘footwear’ for the job.

Presenter biographies

Alasdair Richardson is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader of the Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) & Masters in Social research in Education (MRes). He teaches across the university’s teacher education programmes and his research focus is Holocaust Education.

Rhiannon Love is a Senior Lecturer and Route Leader for the PGCE Secondary RE. She teaches across the university’s teacher education programmes and has expertise in Philosophy for Children (P4C). Her doctoral study is exploring beginning teachers’ identity. 

Network: Postgraduate Issues
Date(s): Thursday, 25 October 2018
Times: 12:00 - 16:15
Location: SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE
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